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GT7 Race Log - Circuit de Sainte-Croix C GR.1 Prototype Series

 Hot damn! Ran this last night and came 16th with best time of 3:14 (RM tyres, single pitstop). Today I ran it, and that A. Wilk AI player knocked in a 3:06:XX as his hottest laptop and I managed a 3:07:XX. Came 2nd! I'm super happy with that. Running in the TS050 - Hybrid '16 and on soft tyres this time. At lap 6 dived in for fuel and new tyres - knocked me back a few places (I think I was 9th at the time) but I came out, flicked the fuel ratio to 1 and full power, then kicked it in the guts and got underway.


2nd is so much better than I hoped for. This run I was aiming for a top 10 at best, so I'm very pleased. I've struggled a bit at Daytona, but now I'm getting used to the handling of these Gr.1 cars - they're so different to the other classes, with really short braking zones, and absolutely heaps of power. 


Woohoo! More to come on this baby, yeah!

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